Activities & Resources

Leadership Unleashed

The Engineering Unleashed Fellowship is comprised of faculty who were selected by their peers for their contribution to entrepreneurial engineering education. These faculty participated in the Engineering Unleashed Faculty Development National Workshop Program, advancing the community's mission to integrate entrepreneurial mindset into practices that benefit their students, their institutions, and greater society.

View their cards below to get activities and resources for your classes, courses, and campus!

Leadership Unleashed

Leadership Unleashed: Creating Curricular Change in an Undergraduate Engineering Program

Leadership Unleashed: Creating Curricular Change in an Undergraduate Engineering Program, by Jacqueline Gartner

This card describes the process to make curricular change at an undergraduate engineering institution. Components include making connections with appropriate stakeholders at your institution, creating value by benchmarking your instructional curriculum with others around the country, and other considerations in the process. Leading this process is a way to initiate change and lead and effort at a university without a formal leadership title.
Leadership Unleashed: On the Path to an Interdisciplinary Design Certificate

Leadership Unleashed: On the Path to an Interdisciplinary Design Certificate, by Jessica P.M. Fick

Industry partners convey the value of interdisciplinary work and communication. This card documents the process and details to establish an Interdisciplinary Design Certificate consisting of a 3 course sequence of project based courses offered to all engineering disciplines and other interested majors. This certificate will allow students to opt in while allowing some requirements to count towards their degree. This will provide a unique and valuable/marketable experience for students.
Leadership Unleashed from the Grassroots

Leadership Unleashed From the Grassroots, by Sarah Brownell

Get motivated! This card explores how a grassroots team of faculty, staff, and students can drive change even when an idea is not initially a priority of university leadership. It provides a scaffolding of suggestions for starting and growing an idea as well as an example of how a loosely organized team at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) has used these strategies to better integrate community engaged learning into the engineering curriculum.