Activities & Resources

Entrepreneurially Minded Learning (EML) & Student Research

The Engineering Unleashed Fellowship is comprised of faculty who were selected by their peers for their contribution to entrepreneurial engineering education. These faculty participated in the Engineering Unleashed Faculty Development National Workshop Program, advancing the community's mission to integrate entrepreneurial mindset into practices that benefit their students, their institutions, and greater society.

View their cards below to get activities and resources for your classes, courses, and campus!

Entrepreneurially Minded Learning (EML) & Student Research

Intentionally Creative Making

Intentionally Creative Making, by Chris Sharp

For an entrepreneurial mindset to be effective, creativity is paramount. The purpose of this tool is to aid participants in realizing their own creative capabilities through the intentional connection of making with art. Participants will explore making throughout history, seek personal inspiration, and make a creative representation of a STEM principle.
Making the Mindless Meaningful: Infusing the 3 C's in a Mortar Making PBL

Making the Mindless Meaningful: Infusing the 3 C's in a Mortar Making PBL, by Daniel Castaneda

Through crafting the curricular materials for a third-year engineering materials and mechanics course, the research team identified opportunities to prototype a learning process geared toward CAD mold design with an emphasis on simplistic technical concepts.
Measuring Stuff: Student-Guided Project to Practice Measurement System Development

Measuring Stuff: Student-Guided Project to Practice Measurement System Development, by James Mynderse

This course introduces students to the use and design of measurement systems for engineering practice. The goal is encourage students to engage with the material through their curiosity while balancing the feasibility of student generated ideas with available lab equipment. Students developed individual research questions and selected their best few. Within the group, each student pitched their research questions. Finally, the group selected a favorite research question and developed a project proposal.
Research and EML: Helping Students See and Understand the Value of Research

Research and EML: Helping Students See and Understand the Value of Research, by Kenneth Van Treuren

Why research? What can an undergraduate do in research? What do I need to be useful in a global world? Often the focus on the research misses the connection of research to entrepreneurially minded learning. Use these videos/modules (5-10 minutes each) to help undergrads and graduate students as well as faculty see and understand the value of research. The videos/modules will touch on curiosity, connections, and creating value for each topic.
Distributed Enhancement of EML in a Research Project Capstone Course Sequence

Distributed Enhancement of EML in a Research Project Capstone Course Sequence, by Brian Ritchie

In this year-long distributed intervention, the entrepreneurial mindset was openly taught and discussed in parallel with student teams working on research projects. The two-semester research projects capstone course sequence teaches student teams how to conceive, design, implement and operate (CDIO) a research project that combines both computational and experimental aspects. Because the course sequence is naturally aligned with the engineering mindset and is already time-limited, this intervention focuses on making entrepreneurially minded learning explicit without significantly changing the student workload.
EML and Student Research: Understanding and Engaging Under-Resourced College Students

EML and Student Research: Understanding and Engaging Under-Resourced College Students, by Jonathan Leinonen

This student-led, faculty-guided research project endeavors to establish what specific opportunities exist to better understand the conditions from which under-resourced students enroll, how faculty, particularly of first-year students, can engage and support retention of under-resourced students, and help to infuse information and social capital with under-resourced students supporting their graduation, career goals and long term benefits to the regional economy.
Bring Your Own Data: Supporting the Development of Student Curiosity for Statistics

Bring Your Own Data: Supporting the Development of Student Curiosity for Statistics, by Patrick Gurian

Statistics is sometimes perceived as dry or only tangentially related to engineering practice. In this card, students are first exposed to a literal life or death situation: The hazard posed by carbon monoxide intoxication. As part of a class discussion, students are guided in identifying how statistics can inform engineering practice in addressing this risk. Students are then asked to conduct a small project that demonstrates how statistics can be used to create value.