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University of San Diego
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The Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering provides engineering students with a holistic education so they are prepared to take on society's challenges and opportunities in socially, ethically and professionally responsible ways. We deliver a high-quality student-centered engineering education that provides distinctive, authentic and supportive experiences that inspire students to make a positive difference. Our School is revolutionizing engineering education, with the aim of preparing students to innovate engineering solutions developed within a contextual framework that embeds humanitarian, sustainable and social justice approaches while infusing professional skills into the curriculum.

We provide a high-quality undergraduate education by emphasizing small classes and a high level of faculty-student interaction. The Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering has recently ranked among the top 11 programs at non-Ph.D. granting institutions by U.S. News and World Report. The school currently houses undergraduate degrees in engineering (integrated engineering), electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, industrial & systems engineering, and computer science.

Our vision focuses on six pathways: Becoming an Anchor Institution, Enabling Engaged Scholarship, Practicing Changemaking, Caring for our Common Home, Fostering Access and Inclusion, and Embedding the Liberal Arts in Engineering Education.

We value being a KEEN partner because it feeds directly into our vision and one of our university strategic pathways: changemaking. We are an Ashoka Changemaker campus, and thus the entire campus values “making positive impact.”

A partnership with KEEN would come as we have just finalized a university strategic plan and are working on a new strategic plan for the school. Having a partnership with KEEN has the potential to catalyze more faculty around mission and vision.
We are excited about expanding our network and capacity to engage students and faculty in developing an entrepreneurial mindset through KEEN’s leadership.
--Chell Roberts, Associate Provost PCE, Dean of the Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering
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Anna Hecht & 8 others
published a card
KEEN Talks are TED-style talks that inspire & share a story.

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Melissa Gibbons
published a card
Who: This group project was designed for an introductory Thermodynamics course taken by all engineering students at the University of San Diego (USD), typically in their second year. The course enrollment averages about 35 students. To engage all students in the project, it focuses on two topics that all of them are likely to have a connection with regardless of their chosen major: contemporary energy issues and the financial well-being of USD.  What: In this project-based module, groups of 4-5 are asked to design two energy plans for USD: a natural gas power plant using the Rankine cycle and a renewable energy portfolio that would meet USD’s energy demands. At the end of the project, each group must recommend one of their two energy plans to the Board of Trustees based on provided criteria. Why: This project was designed with three objectives in mind: the application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics and cycle analysis to a realistic and open-ended problem; the exploration of contemporary energy topics that are not contained in the textbook, and to incorporate entrepreneurially-minded learning by posing the problem in such a way to create curiosity about the potential solutions, make connections between the technical designs and the broader impact those designs have from economic, environmental, or social points of view, and to motivate the students to create value for the USD community. When and where: The project was implemented over the last 10 weeks of a 15-week semester. Project tasks were assigned periodically, and a final technical report and presentation were due at the semester’s end. Three 55-minute lecture sessions were devoted to the project roll out, guided background research (two versions of this activity have been deployed, see Instructor Notes for more information), and the final presentations. Some of the assigned technical work was aligned with lecture material (e.g., Rankine cycle) to replace the traditional homework assignment associated with that topic.  Project organization (details of each task can be found in Instructor Notes): · Project roll out: tour existing rooftop solar panels* · Task 1: Determine USD’s energy needs [1 week] · Task 2: Background research [2 weeks]* · Task 3: Renewable energy plan [2 weeks] · Task 4: Natural gas power plant design (Rankine cycle) [2 weeks] · Task 5: Final report and presentation [2 weeks]* * - indicates an in-class session was used