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Colorado School of Mines
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Mines is organized into three colleges, each offering ABET-accredited degrees. The College of Engineering and Computational Sciences (CECS) comprises some of the more "traditional" disciplines, with programs in civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as programs in computer science and applied mathematics and statistics. A new program in CECS is the flexible pathway BS in Engineering degree, which features a unique series of six design studios (one per semester each year before senior design) and allows students to develop individualized focus areas. The College of Applied Science and Engineering (CASE) includes programs in chemistry, engineering physics, chemical engineering, and materials and metallurgical engineering. CASE programs offer more of a science orientation. The College of Earth Resources Science and Engineering (CERSE) contains the original, "foundational" programs at Mines, primarily focused on resource discovery and recovery, with programs in geological, mining, geophysical, and petroleum engineering as well as programs in economics and business. CERSE also houses the humanities, arts, and social sciences. The vision of the three engineering colleges at Mines mirrors that of the institution. All three aspire to be a go-to destination for their programs as a result of the impact that their students make in the world.

Why does Mines value being a KEEN Partner?

Mines is unique in that it provides a very hands-on experience to its undergraduates. As part of our philosophy, we encourage students to participate in many activities, in and out of class, that require the use of tools and workspaces. In particular, we have several academic programs that make extensive use of makerspaces and project-based learning. Two programs in particular, entitled Cornerstone (Freshman-year) and Capstone (Senior Design) programs, help define the undergraduate experience at Mines. Additionally, there are a wide array of activities that have significant entrepreneurial content relevant to KEEN. These include numerous Innovation Competitions and College Trade Fairs.
The administration at Mines is fully committed to the development of entrepreneurial programs, which is highlighted as a strategic goal in our 10-year strategic plan as, “Mines must operate with the entrepreneurial mindset of a private institution that promotes innovation in our programs.” The new Mines Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation provides the necessary foundation to allow us to integrate entrepreneurial programs into our curriculum and support related extracurricular programs.
--Dr. Paul Johnson, President, Colorado School of Mines
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Jianyu Liang & 3 others
published a card
An essential book that unlocks the secrets of highly successful groups and provides readers with a toolkit for building a cohesive, innovative culture, from the New York Times bestselling author of The Talent Code Photo Credit:  The Culture Code Visual Synopsis by Dani Saveker

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Salman Mohagheghi
published a card
This exercise is intended for courses related to data science (under either EE or CS programs). The goal of this exercise is to teach the students, through a mini course project, how to develop a model and revise/improve it based on feedback received. The focus of the exercise is on modeling human behavior as it relates to energy consumption and on investigating how success rate of energy conservation programs can be improved. Technical background: Demand Response (DR) is a tool through which consumers can play an active role in the energy market. During times of peak electricity consumption, utilities often face shortage of available generation capacity. To meet this demand, they either have to purchase energy from the spot market (which is very expensive and will affect the monthly bills of consumers) or shed some load (which is highly undesirable from a utility’s perspective and can negatively affect its reliability rating). One of the most common forms of DR is Direct Load Control (DLC), which is tailored towards residential customers. Here, the utility installs a device at the residential A/C unit to be able to remotely monitor and control it. During times of peak demand (e.g. summer afternoons when air conditioning energy consumption is high), the utility may unilaterally turn off the A/C units of a select group of residents for a certain period of time (typically one to two hours). This way, it may be able to temporarily achieve congestion relief in the grid. This is referred to as the DR event. As more houses are becoming equipped with home energy management systems (HEMS), more and more consumers may decide not to comply with the DR event and continue using their A/C units. As a result, when the time comes to reduce the demand, the utility may experience less-than-expected demand reduction. Ensuring maximum participation in DR events is a top priority for electric utilities. To do this, they often try to customize their DR programs to the needs and habits of their customers.  Other Related Cards: Please visit Analysis of Dynamic Systems.